Citing Rising Healthcare Costs, Millennials Ditch Smartphones in Favor of Comprehensive Coverage

USA – A 2018 Brookings Institute study of United States citizens and healthcare coverage found that a growing number of 25-40 year-olds have begun sacrificing their smart phones for a more inclusive coverage plan.

In 2017, the Institute found that 87% of Americans aged 25-40 owned or intended to purchase a smartphone within the coming three months. This was a trend visible for the past five years across the United States. All of that changed in 2018, however.

“I just think it’s time for me to be more conscientious of my health,” said Tori Reynolds, 31, a vet tech in Tuscaloosa. “I have a life partner now, and if I got sick I wouldn’t know what would happen. It’s scary.” Reynolds recently sold her iPhone XS on eBay to a customer in Bangkok. She proudly showed off her new Nokia flip phone. “It’s crazy to think that I can now afford dental and vision without that thing. I’m never looking back.”

Reynolds is just one on the growing millions of millennials who have decided that their smart phone, while being a useful tool in every day life, is no match for excellent health. The rising cost of coverage in the United States has pushed this generation over the brink, and they’re not looking back.

“I got new glasses,” said James L. Harper, 34, a librarian in suburban Detroit. “Look at these bad boys. I can see that street sign over there now. Before this, all I had was that Samsung Galaxy and blurry vision. I’m so happy.”

The trend of millennials being forward-thinking and into their long-term health is unexpected, and economists are concerned that the smartphone market shrinking could be costly to manufacturers like Apple and Samsung.

“It’s like Rep. Jason Chaffetz said,” quoted Tori Reynolds, referencing a 2017 CNN interview with the former Utah congressman. “We’re giving up these things we ‘just love’ in favor of our future. He was right all along.”

by Pembry Cornish